45 unique apartments

The excellence is in the details

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The
Landscaper

Organic forms, real materials, big gestures

Robert Broekema
Landscape gardener

Sud’s courtyard garden has to be a delight both for the people who make use of it and for everyone who sees it. So says Robert Broekema, who is responsible for designing both this garden and that of ‘the neighbours’. These two areas will soon be experienced as a single large green courtyard garden, in which a clear idea of tension and space is created through playing with lines and organic forms to break through uniform patterns.

“I make it possible for those who use the gardens to get a glimpse over the hedges, so they let go of the idea that space ends at your own boundary.”

Beech trees and Hydrangeas

“Three homeowners and a commercial tenant from the ground floor area will soon be able to use the courtyard garden that we are creating. They all want the same thing: a garden in which you can recognise the seasons, which is pleasing and easy to make use of and appears larger than it actually is. We also want to provide the residents of the upper floor apartments a view of a lively, green outdoor space.”

“Because the Sud building is very straight, I have developed a design that uses shape and diagonal lines to create tension and make the gardens appear bigger. And I make it possible for those who use the gardens to get a glimpse over the hedges, so they let go of the idea that space ends at your own boundary.”

“I got the inspiration for this way of designing and developing a shared garden from America. When houses are built as a combined group of 12 or 16 houses, they are laid out surrounding the garden. The whole development is then designed in a park-like, organic style, with each house still having its own piece of garden. This gives the residents privacy while still being able to enjoy more than their individually allocated space.”